My Boss, My Hero Review

Here’s a show that seriously crept up on me. I really thought I was not going to like it for several reasons. Instead, I ended up thoroughly enjoying it. That show is “My Boss, My Hero”.

The title explains a lot of what the show is about. In fact, I’m going to go out on a limb and say this is the best English-named show in the history of J-Drama. I’m going to go even further and say this might be the best use of English for Japanese people in the entire country, for anything.

See, the title plays on the double meaning of the phrase. Depending on how you read it it could either mean “My boss, who is also my hero” or it could mean “My (person X) boss, and my (person Y) hero”. See how that works?

So, the question you immediately ask is, “which one is it?”

The answer is both, which qualifies this for the best English title in Japan. I’m not sure who came up with this title but 1) give that person an award and 2) pay them some money to redo all your horrible translations everywhere else in the country.

Makio Sakaki is second in line to take over a powerful yfamily. He’s the strongest member in any yakuza family and is rightfully feared. The problem is he’s also the dumbest member of any yakuza family. He fights so well people call him “tornado” for being able to wipe out entire rival gangs single-handed. He also destroys really good negotiations single-handed.

Therefore, his father makes a deal. Makio must return to high school for the senior year and graduate or else he will find another person to take over the clan when he steps down. Makio, loving the yakuza, grudgingly accepts.

For those of you born long ago enough that you remember Adam Sandler as a good comedian, this might remind you a little of Billy Madison. And I think that comparison has some merit. Certainly, the plot follows much the same structure as Billy Madison.

I had high doubts as to whether I would enjoy this one.

Not only am I not a big fan of the Billy Madison theme, this drama plays on a lot of typical J-drama tropes I’m not a fan of. It centers around high school life, it resorts to “Japanese humor”, the lead is a long-hair Japanese pretty boy. Usually I make it about 60 minutes – 10 minutes per above situations present. That would normally make this one a 30 minute drama experience.

Yet, it works. First, Makio’s facial expressions are hilarious. Yeah, they are juvenile, but they are hilarious. It’s really the first thing that got me to enjoy the drama.

Furthermore, the show is about more than just high school life. It really does a good job at showing the personal growth of an individual when confronted with a situation contrary to their character. There are many touching moments and the character growth of Makio is fun to watch develop. In fact, Makio essentially develops 2 personalities: “Makio” and “Makky”. Makio himself undergoes the transformation through language use, tone of voice, hair style change, and clothing changes. The highlights of the show are when these two personalities clash or need to appear at the same time.

There are two things I’m not overly fond of in the drama.

First, the romantic relationships never develop. They are teased at but that’s about it. I’m not necessarily a big fan of romantic relationships all over the place but these seem a little weird. It’s almost as if they were half written and then forgotten about. I would have liked to see at least each person dealing with the resolution of a romantic interest not developing as hoped. One love interest in particular is hinted at and teased for 3/4 of the show, only to have it disappear as if it never existed.

An aside to this is Makio’s love interest. Now, you forget often during the show that Makio is supposed to be 28 years old when he returns for school. His girlfriend is 17. This never feels weird or odd in the show, but after everything ends you do tend to start thinking about that. I’ll let you decide how that stands with you. (Note: the actress who plays this part will appear more prominently in my next show review)

Second, the final episode is pretty bad. It’s really just a ceremonial reunion show. Japanese shows seem to have the “let’s overview the entire show” format for final episodes, which puts them at a disadvantage, but they can still be done alright (see Tokyo Love Story – the most difficult to watch last episode I can think of). This one is just bad. It leaves you feeling unsatisfied with the entire experience almost. It’s hard to say what they could have done differently seeing how the episode begins, but it would have been nice to have a better send off.

Japanese Level: Standard to extreme

Makio is a yakuza boss. This presents several problems. First, he speaks like a yakuza gangster. This is not normal Japanese. It’s very gutteral, very guyish, and uses tons of curse words and other forms you would never hear anywhere else in Japan. Yakuza speech to Japanese people is instantly recognizable, and there’s a reason. Second, it also means his underlings have a tendency to use very elevated speech when speaking to him. There’s even a small comical part when one uses standard politeness and Makio threatens to kill him for not addressing him with the proper respect. This requires very good Japanese skills to stay with the politeness shifts and different vocabulary used.

On the other hand, when Makky is in school it’s pretty standard Japanese. Nothing too difficult here. There’s some “high school talk” here and there, but overall I think it’s manageable.

Final Thoughts: A highly recommended show. Perfect for anyone who likes watching characters struggle with immense personal growth, the battle of destiny over desire, or pretty-boy Japanese guys.

Final Verdict: J-drama Watch-o-rating =  In the upper tier, but not the premium tier. Watch.

Update

No, I have not forgotten about my blog. I have been without a computer for 2 months now. I just haven’t gotten around to blogging much.

I’ve also been fairly busy with prepping and studying for graduate school since the new year. Previous to that I spent about 8 weeks getting my application material ready. Right now I’m putting about 1 1/2 hours in every day to studying/reading Latin and Greek. It’s not a great deal of time necessarily, but combined with not having a computer it has added a little to not blogged for a while.

Maybe you’ve seen in the news but Japan has undergone record snowfalls as of late. We had over 4 feet of snow in 8 days. Some places had 6 feet or more. (180 cm +)  Coming from Minnesota I’m used to big snowfalls. What I’m not used to is a system that can’t handle them / doesn’t want to handle them. That has been a new experience. Food shelves were barren for 5 days, restaurants were closed, fast food joints were closed, food was scarce, the roads were all closed, trains weren’t running. It was a disaster! I’ve never seen anything like that before in my life.

Things are finally starting to get back to normal. I doubt it’s over as there is snow in the forecast. Should be fun.

Anyway, today’s post is another show review. It should be up later today.